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U.S. is ‘fully prepared’ if Russia invades Ukraine, Secretary of State says


Russian tanks participate in coaching drills in southern Russia this week because it rejects Western complaints about its troop buildup close to Ukraine.

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Russian tanks participate in coaching drills in southern Russia this week because it rejects Western complaints about its troop buildup close to Ukraine.

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Secretary of State Antony Blinken says the U.S. is planning “things we’ve not done in the past” if Russia invades Ukraine.

His feedback observe days of diplomatic talks and a impasse on resolving the disaster brewing alongside the Ukrainian border.

Russia has 100,000 troops lined up subsequent to Ukraine, with tanks and artillery. While it stays unclear whether or not Russia will invade Ukraine, specialists like retired Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman are usually not assured that Russian President Vladimir Putin will maintain off. On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being almost definitely that an invasion will occur, Vindman provides it an 8.

“The most likely scenario in my mind is a major military offensive in Ukraine,” stated Vindman, a former director for European affairs on the United States National Security Council. “I hope I’m wrong, but that’s what I see.”

Secretary of State Blinken would not say how seemingly he thought an invasion was, however that Putin is expert at maintaining choices open and is probably going weighing his odds on what may go and what will not.

“It may well be that he’s not fully decided on what he’s going to do,” Blinken informed All Things Considered on Thursday. “We have, I think, an important responsibility to help shape his thinking and again make very clear from our perspective what the options are, what the consequences will be of the options that he could pursue.”

To get a way of the context behind the present tensions and the diplomacy that occurred this week, NPR’s All Things Considered spoke to each Vindman and Blinken. Here’s what they needed to say:

Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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Where do issues stand now after per week of talks?

Blinken stated there was nonetheless time for the international locations to succeed in an settlement.

“There are opportunities, I think, to address concerns that we all have about security in Europe and to make meaningful progress in ways that potentially could answer some Russian legitimate concerns and answer, critically, the many concerns that we and the Europeans have,” Blinken stated. “Alternatively, as I said, if [Putin] chooses renewed aggression against Ukraine, that’s going to have consequences too.”

If there may be going to be progress, Blinken stated it will not “happen in an environment of escalation with a gun to Ukraine’s head.”

“We’re going to need to see some meaningful de-escalation if there’s actually going to be concrete progress,” he stated.

Russian troopers participate in drills on the Kadamovskiy firing vary close to the Ukraine border.

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Russian troopers participate in drills on the Kadamovskiy firing vary close to the Ukraine border.

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What are the sticking factors between the 2 international locations?

Russia introduced a list of security demands to the desk this week. Among them are Russia’s want to have “legally binding guarantees” that Ukraine would by no means be allowed to hitch NATO; the elimination of NATO arms from Eastern Europe; a ban on intermediate-range missiles in Europe; and autonomy for japanese Ukraine.

The demands outlined by Russia would finally result in Ukraine being a weaker state, one thing that Vindman believes is Putin’s major purpose.

“There is a deep fear of Ukraine slipping out of Russia’s sphere of influence,” Vindman stated about issues in Moscow. “What you have, since 2014, is you have a country that’s continued to develop and coalesce around a national identity,” he stated of Ukraine. “You have a country that’s achieving fairly significant levels of growth.”

Vindman stated that if Ukraine may transition to a democracy then the query would develop into “why can’t Russia do the same thing?”

Secretary of State Antony Blinken.

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Secretary of State Antony Blinken.

Kenzo Tribouillard/POOL/AFP through Getty Images

What may the U.S. do at this level?

Blinken has warned Russia repeatedly there shall be “massive consequences” if it does assault Ukraine, with out going into a lot element.

The U.S. has positioned sanctions on Russia, together with in 2014 after Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine. More sanctions got here after Russia’s interference within the U.S. election in 2016. Last April the U.S. levied sanctions in opposition to Russia after the Solar Winds cyberattack in 2020, which compromised practically 100 firms and authorities companies, together with Microsoft, Intel, the Pentagon and extra.

“I’m not going to telegraph with specificity what we would do, except to say that when it comes to sanctions, when it comes to economic and financial measures, as well as measures to, as necessary, reinforce Ukraine defensively, reinforce NATO defensively, we are planning and putting together things that we have not done in the past,” Blinken stated. “And I think Russia’s well aware of many of the things that we would do if they put us in a position where we have to do them.”

While Blinken hasn’t dominated sanctions out, Vindman is satisfied they will not work.

“Russia’s actually hardened against sanctions,” Vindman stated. “In addition to a hardening against economic sanctions, in addition to indigenizing technologies and supply chains to Russia. So being less concerned about what comes in from the U.S., being less concerned about what comes in from Europe, they’ve also built a massive war chest — $620 billion — that gives them a significant cushion to ride through some of these sanctions.”



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